Chapter 9. DOMESTIC PLATE-EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

Table of Contents

THE INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL LIFE
INCREASED TRADE BROUGHT PROSPERITY
A TRANSITION PERIOD
A LANDMARK IN HISTORY
ARTISTIC TASTES
MUFFINEERS AND PEPPERETTES
A Dish of TEA

The influence of social life-Increased trade brought prosperity-A transition period-A landmark in history-Artistic tastes-Muffineers and Pepperettes-A dish of tea. WHEN we reach the eighteenth century we get more in touch with the conditions of life as they were in this country in olden time. There is a closer connection between the people who lived then and our own times than with those who lived at an earlier date, and we understand better their habits and customs. Indeed, in the English homes of to-day there are in daily use many things nearly the same as were in common use two centuries ago-those we now use being but modified and modernised replicas of the domestic wares of the eighteenth century. Let us for a moment turn to the actual happenings and conditions of that time. We cannot forget that even yet England was then under the influence of foreign workmen, and that when the eighteenth century dawned the people of this country had not forgotten that William of Orange and his Consort brought over with them much that was distinctly Dutch in character, and a few years later when Queen Anne reigned the styles that were in after years looked upon as English, and always associated with Queen Anne's reign, had not been formulated. The strong influence of Dutch artists was still felt, but in the craftsmanship of those early days of the century were the beginnings from which would be shaped Queen Anne and early Georgian styles which became the national shapes and ornament of English silver and metal ware.