DR. PANGLOSS?

This most worthy gentleman appears in Voltaire's satirical novel " Candide," and whenever he appears the air becomes charged with optimism. No pessimistic outlook can endure for a moment when Pangloss arrives on the scene, for he demonstrates time and time again that everything is for the best in the best of all possible worlds. According to his quaint philosophy, things cannot be other than they are, for as everything was made for one end, everything is necessarily for the best end. " Remark well," he commands, " that the nose is formed to have spectacles, so we have spectacles. The legs were obviously instituted to be breeched, and we have breeches. Pigs were made to be eaten, we eat pork all the year." Candide, the hero of the book, undergoes the most incredible misfortunes, and suffers every inconceivable kind of injury, but on each occasion he calls his friend Pangloss to mind, and remembers that everything is for the best in the best of all possible worlds.